Why teach cooking in school?

We call the cooking classroom a Nutritional Science Lab, as we engage in science experiments with edible results, most of the time! Students discover the preserving properties of salt, the science of nutrition, the chemistry of baking, and the microscopic world of taste buds. They are enriched by social and emotional learning, understanding the history and culture of food, and developing vital life skills like how to follow directions. Our curriculum meets California Health Education content standards, and makes it fun.

Why teach cooking in school?

We call the cooking classroom a Nutritional Science Lab, as we engage in science experiments with edible results, most of the time! Students discover the preserving properties of salt, the science of nutrition, the chemistry of baking, and the microscopic world of taste buds. They are enriched by social and emotional learning, understanding the history and culture of food, and developing vital life skills like how to follow directions. Our curriculum meets California Health Education content standards, and makes it fun.

Why have gardens in schools?

Gardens are outdoor science labs. Students learn about seasons, botany, Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM), Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), even elementary hydrodynamic engineering as they plan and install irrigation lines. And today’s focus on social/emotional learning is fostered in gardens, with time for calm, observation, and reflection…a perfect inspiration for a composition. History and geography come into play with farming techniques. Even the sixth grade unit on entrepreneurship is enriched when it starts in the garden.

Why will your school administration approve? Preliminary research shows, and we are working to collect evidence that:

  • Student attendance is higher than average on regularly-scheduled garden days
  • Improved academic performance is reported with programs like this in place
  • School lunch participation is not abandoned when healthier options are introduced

Why have gardens in schools?

Gardens are outdoor science labs. Students learn about seasons, botany, Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM), Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), even elementary hydrodynamic engineering as they plan and install irrigation lines. And today’s focus on social/emotional learning is fostered in gardens, with time for calm, observation, and reflection…a perfect inspiration for a composition. History and geography come into play with farming techniques. Even the sixth grade unit on entrepreneurship is enriched when it starts in the garden.

Why will your school administration approve? Preliminary research shows, and we are working to collect evidence that:

  • Student attendance is higher than average on regularly-scheduled garden days
  • Improved academic performance is reported with programs like this in place
  • School lunch participation is not abandoned when healthier options are introduced

Pilot Program – Ocean Knoll Elementary

Everyone has to start somewhere, and we began on this ocean-view campus in Encinitas, California. Surrounded by properties with rocketing real estate values, the school retains its Title 1 status and serves a high percentage of English as a Second Language students. Now a sought-after school to enroll in, with an enviable facility and program in place, we are proud to share this campus’ pride.

Learn more

Pilot Program – Ocean Knoll Elementary

Everyone has to start somewhere, and we began on this ocean-view campus in Encinitas, California. Surrounded by properties with rocketing real estate values, the school retains its Title 1 status and serves a high percentage of English as a Second Language students. Now a sought-after school to enroll in, with an enviable facility and program in place, we are proud to share this campus’ pride.

Learn more

Pilot Program – Ocean Knoll Elementary

Everyone has to start somewhere, and we began on this ocean-view campus in Encinitas, California. Surrounded by properties with rocketing real estate values, the school retains its Title 1 status and serves a high percentage of English as a Second Language students. Now a sought-after school to enroll in, with an enviable facility and program in place, we are proud to share this campus’ pride.

Learn more

extracurriculars

Sage Garden Project staff have tested many activities, and have settled on a number of favorite extracurricular offerings, which other campuses could emulate, including:

  • Foodie Fridays – during this 1-1/2 hour club for grades 3-6, we experiment with new recipes, bring in guest speakers, preserve garden produce, and generally play with our food.
  • Junior Master Gardeners – this fun and educational weekly club is based on the Texas A&M-authored program, complete with service projects to undertake and pins to earn.
  • Soup Night – developed to serve the need for dinner before the school’s annual Open House, we offer endless bowls of soup and bread for a small donation – now a beloved institution and tremendous fund-raiser for the school!
  • Thanksgiving Thursdays – created on request from our immigrated families, who asked to learn about traditional recipes in the weeks leading up to the holiday.
  • Summer Camps – Several week-long camp themes, offered annually. Kids spend the morning gardening, prepare their own lunch, eat and cleanup, then play raucous outdoor games until ending time.
  • Garden Fridays – weekly morning gatherings throughout the summer bring together students, their families, and community members as they perform garden maintenance and share in the summer’s bounty.

extracurriculars

Sage Garden Project staff have tested many activities, and have settled on a number of favorite extracurricular offerings, which other campuses could emulate, including:

  • Foodie Fridays – during this 1-1/2 hour club for grades 3-6, we experiment with new recipes, bring in guest speakers, preserve garden produce, and generally play with our food.
  • Junior Master Gardeners – this fun and educational weekly club is based on the Texas A&M-authored program, complete with service projects to undertake and pins to earn.
  • Soup Night – developed to serve the need for dinner before the school’s annual Open House, we offer endless bowls of soup and bread for a small donation – now a beloved institution and tremendous fund-raiser for the school!
  • Thanksgiving Thursdays – created on request from our immigrated families, who asked to learn about traditional recipes in the weeks leading up to the holiday.
  • Summer Camps – Several week-long camp themes, offered annually. Kids spend the morning gardening, prepare their own lunch, eat and cleanup, then play raucous outdoor games until ending time.
  • Garden Fridays – weekly morning gatherings throughout the summer bring together students, their families, and community members as they perform garden maintenance and share in the summer’s bounty.

extracurriculars

Sage Garden Project staff have tested many activities, and have settled on a number of favorite extracurricular offerings, which other campuses could emulate, including:

  • Foodie Fridays – during this 1-1/2 hour club for grades 3-6, we experiment with new recipes, bring in guest speakers, preserve garden produce, and generally play with our food.
  • Junior Master Gardeners – this fun and educational weekly club is based on the Texas A&M-authored program, complete with service projects to undertake and pins to earn.
  • Soup Night – developed to serve the need for dinner before the school’s annual Open House, we offer endless bowls of soup and bread for a small donation – now a beloved institution and tremendous fund-raiser for the school!
  • Thanksgiving Thursdays – created on request from our immigrated families, who asked to learn about traditional recipes in the weeks leading up to the holiday.
  • Summer Camps – Several week-long camp themes, offered annually. Kids spend the morning gardening, prepare their own lunch, eat and cleanup, then play raucous outdoor games until ending time.
  • Garden Fridays – weekly morning gatherings throughout the summer bring together students, their families, and community members as they perform garden maintenance and share in the summer’s bounty.

get involved

Happily, one of the questions we are asked most frequently is “How can I help?”

For Individuals:

Check our map for a Sage Garden Project-supported school to help directly. Individual schools can almost always use contributions:

  • Know how to write? Assist the school by applying for grants on their behalf.
  • Know how to build or repair stuff? There is always a need for this in the garden.
  • Help prep or wash dishes from a cooking class.
  • Volunteer to weed!

For Groups: See below! 

get involved

Happily, one of the questions we are asked most frequently is “How can I help?”

For Individuals:

Check our map for a Sage Garden Project-supported school to help directly. Individual schools can almost always use contributions:

  • Know how to write? Assist the school by applying for grants on their behalf.
  • Know how to build or repair stuff? There is always a need for this in the garden.
  • Help prep or wash dishes from a cooking class.
  • Volunteer to weed!

For Groups: See below! 

partner with sage garden project

Does growing/cooking/composting education resonate with you, maybe even align with your corporate goals? While we are working diligently to have these programs become part of every student’s experience, for now it takes some public-private cooperative efforts. There are many ways to help! Keep reading for avenues you might not have considered.

learn more

partner with sage garden project

Does growing/cooking/composting education resonate with you, maybe even align with your corporate goals? While we are working diligently to have these programs become part of every student’s experience, for now it takes some public-private cooperative efforts. There are many ways to help! Keep reading for avenues you might not have considered.

learn more